Back Pain due to seating position?

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Topic Title: Back Pain due to seating position?
Created On: 08/09/2002 01:50 PM

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 12/05/2014 04:17 PM

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angelrobert

Posts: 104

To relieve this pain, I suggest you to take frequent breaks from your desk and move your position, stand up and do some walk because this back pain is just for your same posture position.

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 04/08/2011 03:12 PM

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QiongZhu

Posts: 10

Can't agree more. Easy but very effective method.
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 12/13/2010 10:41 AM

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xsicokyle27

Posts: 12

Do want to follow the post.
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 12/13/2010 10:39 AM

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xsicokyle27

Posts: 12

It seems that standing up and doing exercise is the most efficient and effective way to stretch out and prevent back pain.

Already have back pain. lol.


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 07/07/2010 03:11 PM

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AmariT

Posts: 221

Choir: You didn't link to the article.

I have a terrible sitting habit. Depending on my chair and environment, I'll sit half on my back, I'll sit hunched foward, I'll sit on top of my legs. I think how good your posture is depends a lot on your environment. If the computer is too far from you, you lean forward to see it. If the back of your chair isn't stiff enough, it puts your back in an odd position. Regardless, it's probably best to change positions throughout the day. I doubt staying in any position for a prolonged period of time is healthy.
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 06/30/2010 02:30 PM

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choir

Posts: 10

People have told me all kinds of different ways of sitting properly. I tend to lean forward because I'm constantly staring at the monitor. From what I can gather, it seems as though sitting forward or straight are not as comfortable as sliding backwards, although any long-term seated position will results in some sort of back pain. Read the BBC article here to learn more about the conducted study.
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 06/30/2010 02:28 PM

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choir

Posts: 10

d


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 08/28/2002 04:47 PM

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30323915

Posts: 344

Brian, the first step towards preventing this pain is to take frequent breaks from your desk. Get up and take quick breaks where you can stretch and walk around a bit. Also, make sure that your chair is positioned so that you are not slouching over your desk - posture makes a huge difference when dealing with back issues. Good luck!
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 08/13/2002 12:30 AM

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louisryoshin

Posts: 80

More so than just the eating is the accumulated shortness in the soft connective tissue of your muscles, including the back and inside of the thighs. If you take time in the day to do significant stretching of legs, sides and front of torso, as well as back, you can restretch a lot of this out. If you do 3-5 mins a few times each day it will help...even every hour. The relengthening can be cumulative if you do it repeatedly, and if you are able to get it relengthened enough, you'll have less of the discomfort. Try my free articles and intro articles and testimonials on www.backfixbodywoirk.com email me then if you like.
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 08/09/2002 01:50 PM

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Brian18066

Posts: 6

Hello, As a computer technician, I tend to spend most of the time during the day sitting in the same position. Is it at all possible that my frequent back pain may be caused by a non-ergonomic seating position in work? Are there any websites or resources you would recommend on how I can correct this problem? Thanks, Brian
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